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DB5
1963 - 1965

When Bond actor Sean Connery drove the Silver Birch version of the newly released DB5, it proved perhaps the most inspired piece of product placement in cinema history, with the car inspiring an almost immediate impact on the popular imagination. The car was soon dubbed "the most famous car in the world", a claim that was underlined when a Corgi scale mode of the DB5 - complete with ejector seat and shield - became the biggest-selling toy of 1964. Most significantly for Aston Martin, sales of its cars also increased by 60 per cent.

Background Car

DB5

1963 - 1965

The most famous car in the world

Aston Martin cars became enduring favourites with movie makes, creative artists and celebrities worldwide. Their elegant outlines have regularly appeared in movies, videos and glossy magazines ever since.

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The DB5 was the first road-going Aston Martin to have the 4-litre version of Tadek Marek's twin-cam straight-six engine, first seen in the Lagonda Rapde and the DP215 racing car

An original note of caution from the DB5 handbook: "It is respectfully suggest that the car be driven with extra care until the owner has become thoroughly attuned to its high level of performance.."

Price New£ 3,976 (Saloon), £ 4,194 (Convertible
EngineDOHC Straight six, 3995 cc, 282 bhp @ 5500 rpm
280 lbs-ft @ 4500 rpm
Transmission5-speed ZF box or optional Borg-Warner 3-speed automatic
SuspensionSuspension: Front: Telescopic shock absorbers
Rear: Double acting lever arm shock absorbers
Brakes: Girling Twin servo assisted brakes with front and rear solid discs
Dimensions4570 x 1676 x 1320 mm (Saloon)
4480 x 1676 x 1322 mm (Convertible)
Weight1468kg
Top Speed142 mph
0 - 60 mph7.1 sec
101 YEARS OF
POWER
BEAUTY AND SOUL


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